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Interior design for natural beauty shop

The importance of furniture decorating for a beauty shop

Special furniture for decoring a natural beauty shop

Special furniture for decoring a natural beauty shop

This is, of course, because Takashimaya is in a retail category of its own.

Until this past summer, cosmetics were, in fact, for sale on Takashimaya’s ground level. A small but busy area, the department purveyed exclusive and esoteric product lines, which over the years won a cult following. When it was decided that the department warranted expansion, Takashimaya’s management felt confident that, contrary to industry norms, devotees would follow their favorite products up to the store’s sixth floor. The company called upon architect David Mann of MR Architecture + Decor to create a sophisticated, salon-like setting that would be well worth the elevator ride. Having worked previously on aspects of the store’s design as well as product development, Mann has a firm command of Takashimaya’s luxurious but understated aesthetic.

The apotheosis of subtlety and elegance, Takashimaya’s sixth floor is the opposite of most cosmetics departments. The visual maelstrom of signage, the cacophony of aggressive perfume spritzers, and the blinding glare of make-up lights are noticeably absent. Instead, Takashimaya offers a rather civilized, if not soothing, shopping experience in a setting that is tempered by a muted, earthen color scheme and subdued lighting. Mann’s design represents a skillful integration of materials and textured surfaces. “Nature is a prominent motif throughout the store, and we intended the sixth floor to be as `natural’ as possible,” says Mann, citing the use of wood, plaster, concrete, stone, and bronze. Among the design’s most interesting components is the floor, a combination of valverde stone and cast concrete insets that gives the impressions of wood planks, tatami mats, and raked sand.

Natural beauty shop decoration

Tables, Chairs, Shelves, and Mirrors are used to decorate a convenient space for customers visiting the beauty shop

Tables, Chairs, Shelves, and Mirrors are used to decorate a convenient space for customers visiting the beauty shop

The space is organized around an opening in the floor that establishes a visual connection with the level below. Butterfly-inhabited bronze twigs sculptured by jewelry designer Gabriella Kiss ring the circular aperture, a gesture that brings together nature and artifice. In plan, the space is loosely divided into three areas. The central region, occupied by the bronzed thicket and a pair of commodious, kidskin leather banquettes, serves as a sitting area for shoppers and a waiting area for those with scheduled beauty treatments. Brightened by an expanse of windows, the west side of the floor is devoted to cosmetics while beauty products occupy the east side. A partial-height plaster wall supports an elongated concrete sink with bronze fittings, where tested salves can be rinsed off if a customer so desires. The top-lit plaster partition is a discreet but suggestive divider between the private treatment rooms and the public sales floor.

Perimeter walls feature illuminated bays of transparent glass shelves backed by frosted, mirrored glass panels where products are displayed without signage. Palladium-leafed panels divide each bay, and can slide to protect shelves from dust at night or to highlight a particular product line. Alternatively, rolling carts and antique tables display additional offerings and invite study. As customer service and discretion are of utmost importance at Takashimaya, sales staff consults privately with clients at tables equipped with bronze-framed mirrors. The consultation tables’ lithe silhouettes “offset the architecture,” says Mann, while the mix of antiques adds a “quirky edge.”

David Mann extends credit to William Clukies, Sophie Brouzes, and Renee Cooley.

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Seating Art Furniture: Recliner Chair and Technology Changes

Best Recliners Seating Art

TORGATEC, Germany’s contract furniture fair that takes over Cologne every two years, Vitra introduced a host of products that address a new business problem: how to stay comfortable and focused in an environment that no longer functions exclusively between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Or, in other words, where do you sit and work at ease when the 6:00 a.m. deadline is fast approaching and your back is aching?

Plucked from obscurity by Vitra CEO Roll Fehlbaum, young designer Jakob Gebert created Taino, the third wood recliner chair in the company’s repertoire. In 1996, Fehlbaum participated in a jury of new design work and discovered Gebert’s talents. When he later found out that he and Gebert were neighbors (literally) in Weil am Rhein, Fehlbaum visited the studio and immediately insisted upon a collaborative effort. Following in the footsteps of Charles and Ray Eames’ Plywood Group and the Plywood recliner Chair from Jasper Morrison, Gebert designed a chair using two shells pressed together around an aluminum frame that looks stylish from the bottom up.

Best Recliners Design Model

Best Recliners Design Model

Two years ago, veteran Belgian designer Maarten Van Severen presented the .03 chair, featuring a rigid polyurethane shell that has some give. Following the recliner chair’s success, Van Severen’s swivel version, .04, and his MVS chaise made a grand debut at Orgatec 2000. The sculptural MVS is an austere yet elegant new way to power nap; the shell sits on a tilt mechanism set into an aluminum bridge.

Finally, Vitra’s answer to the technologically advanced ergonomic office recliner chair made its long-awaited debut. Ypsilon, designed by the Italian father-and-son team of Mario and Claudio Bellini, was first shown as a prototype two years ago. After an overhaul, the recliner chair‘s latest incarnation combines aluminum, plastic, rubber, foam, netweave, gel, and textiles with a flexible back support that allows the user to assume an almost entirely recumbent position. Adjustable head support and arm rests complete the package.

Most comfortable recliner office chair

Most comfortable recliner office chair

Also new at Vitra are Ron Arad’s Tom Vac chair on wheels and an Arad rocker as well as a new Philippe Starck swivel called Hula Hoop. This product is made from plastic material for furniture design. Products will be available in the United States in 2001. Vitra, 149 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. www.vitra. com. Nowadays Vitra is also famous foldable table and two person recliner.

A New Starck swivel chair design

A New Starck swivel chair design

Recliners and Furniture Technology Changes

WITH YOUNG, UPSTART TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES bursting onto the business scene (and sometimes quickly fading into the vapor), say goodbye to traditional cubicles, hierarchical corner offices, and wood paneling. Instead, welcome free-form work spaces, specialized work stations that are flexible and mobile, and quirky design statements.

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Breaking out of the beige box, technology giant Intel has been quietly reengineering the interior components of personal computers to create a line of concept PCs. “We learned that consumers want smaller, easier to use, and more attractive personal computers,” says Ralph Bond, Intel’s manager of consumer education. “The first step was to make the interior components smaller. We removed a lot of obsolete hardware and used a single connector to support keyboards, printers, and scanners. This allowed designers to rethink the shape and size of the computer. The results are a set of visionary machines.” Shown here are just two of 15 new ideas: the simple and modular UNiMOD, designed by Palo Alto Products, and the whimsical, biomorphic Magic Bean by Yeong Yang Technologies. Intel, 2200 Mission College Boulevard, P.O. Box 58119, Santa Clara, CA 95052. www.intel.com.

table design

table design

“It used to be about efficiency and structure,” says Greg Parsons, president of Herman Miller Red, a new division that is launching a collection of flexible, lightweight, affordable, and mobile furniture. “Today it’s also about passion and speed. We are responding to the fact that many small businesses and internet companies don’t have a lot of time. They are small, idea-based businesses that are growing fast and moving sometimes twice a year. They want to take their infrastructure with them without a lot of hassle.” In response to this need, Herman Miller Red is offering new office pieces–Reclining chair, Red Rocket and Red Backpack Filecart–from Ayse Birsel and Joe Stone of Olive Designs, as well as Red Spider by Eric Chan of Ecco Design. All products are available online until 2001, when local dealers get involved. Herman Miller, 855 East Main Avenue, Zeeland, MI 49464. www.hermanmiller.com.

furniture technology

furniture technology

Egan Visual’s PowerPlane supports heavy power and data users with 16 duplex plugs and circuitry options that are attached to the Technology Plane and move as the height is adjusted. The Power and Voice/Data Junction Box connects directly from the desktop, and a Power Bar is mounted to the Cable Manager. Other components include: Shelf Plane, with a wire backstop for overhead storage; Technology Plane, for computer monitors; and Keyboard Plane, large enough to accept two keyboards. Egan Visual, 300 Hanlan Road, Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada LHL 3P6. www.egan.com or www.powerplane.com.

This article brings to you by Cuddly Home Advisors
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Plastic and Seating Art

Plastic and Seating Art – Plastic Chair

The enthusiasm expressed in that Society of Plastics Engineers article from 1971 is the manifestation of tireless efforts to merge art and industry. In the previous decade, artistic uses of plastics had been the focus of numerous exhibitions. They did not, however, easily garner industry attention or support, as chemical companies remained largely skeptical about the “value” of art to their booming plastics business. Not until 1968, when “Plastic as Plastic” opened at New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts, now the Museum of Arts and Design, did industry executives really begin to find merit in art.

Plastic and Seating Art - Plastic Chair

Plastic and Seating Art – Plastic Chair

From early in the planning process for “Plastic as Plastic,” it was clear that the scope necessitated outside financial and technical support. Museum director Paul J. Smith spent years soliciting funds from chemical companies, seeking collaboration from industry-wide societies, and researching the artists who took the most interesting approaches to plastics. Though industry interest was high, no company was willing to make the leap to official partnership. Smith’s proposal was turned down by the Dow Corning Corporation, DuPont, Monsanto, and the Union Carbide Corporation, among others.

A partner finally emerged when Smith’s team chose to feature a certain Yale University architecture project in the show. The installation was to be constructed with a urethane spray foam developed by Durex, a division of the Hooker Chemical Company. Hooker therefore agreed to provide the funds, the know-how, and the materials necessary to produce this large foam creation at the museum’s entrance.

Plastic object and its usage

Subsequent exhibitions touted the exceptionality of plastic and presented artists as holding the keys to unlocking its potential. However, the enthusiasm did not continue for long. Acceptance of the material by art critics was mixed, while evidence of safety hazards mounted. As indicated by the name “The Last Plastics Show,” presented in 1972 at the California Institute of the Arts in partnership with the Hastings Plastics Company, the wave of exhibitions had crested.

We now look at plastic objects with little regard for how or why they were made. We think nothing at all when we depress the handle on a toaster, pick up a cell phone, or slide a debit card into an ATM. Plastic has become unremarkable, while it is digital technology that we associate with innovation.

Plastic object

Plastic object

Plastic Material Used in Design: Seating chair, housing, foam,…

Nevertheless, the fact remains that artists working with plastics 50 years ago were what today we would call early adopters. Documentation of those exhibitions contains evidence of an admiration for the breadth of projects that explored the potential of plastic: architecture made of sprayed foam, rainbow-colored sculptures that squished or floated, plans for housing developments in space. Artists employed a test-and-learn attitude, whether their medium was clear or silk-screened acrylic, cast polyester resin, stitched vinyl, vacuum-formed hard plastic, or glistening epoxy.

As curator for the Neuberger’s exhibition, I selected artists including Louise Nevelson, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and Leroy Lamis, because they participated in the seminal plastic shows of the era, were discussed in literature on art and plastic, or incorporated “plasticized” culture into their work. In my research, I reviewed a list of hundreds of three-dimensional objects in the Neuberger collection and flagged words such as neon, light, motorized, and mechanical. I was looking for work that pertained to the history of technology and for artists who contributed to that history within the realm of electronic, computer, and so-called new media art.

I also flagged Hans Haacke for his participation in “Software” at New York’s Jewish Museum in 1970. There are at least two Haacke works at the Neuberger-and both are plastic. This was one of my first clues that plastic objects held potential for my investigation into art and technology.

Another link was Lamis. In the 1970’s, after years of dedicated work with acrylic, his practice evolved beyond plastic. He taught himself how to code software and proceeded to make digital art. Fascinated with his transition from material to virtual technologies, I became even more convinced that plastic was to the 1960’s as the Internet is to now.

Design with plastic - apply to seating chair design

Design with plastic – apply to seating chair design

Viewing plastic objects today, in a museum setting, we can take away many lessons on how artists-and the rest of us-should approach cresting waves of innovation.

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Defining Logic in Design

Defining Logic in Design

Open Areas of Design Functions

Kellen jumps in. “Companies have their own personalities, but creative people have their own needs. They need inspiration and energy in a space that challenges their thinking processes and things taken for granted.” What kinds of things? “Things like scale or degrees of closeness,” he responds. “In an office like this, people get `switched on,’ not only through intellectual expectations, but with intuitive expectations as well. This space asks, without demanding, that you be the best you can be.”

Open area and logic of colors

Open area and logic of colors

Nash urged Kellen to experiment in solving issues relating to population density, open areas free of designated functions with furniture arrangement, fully and partially enclosed meeting rooms, plus a work station landscape integrating ganged units where woody working desk and chair recliners are used, semi-private cubicles and long counter work surfaces. Kellen obliged. He approached the site–actually a pair of them within a warehouse-like structure developed specifically for e-enterprise tenants–as a three-dimensional canvas.

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At the project’s inception, both of the 6,000-sq.-ft. spaces expressed a now-familiar vocabulary. Concrete flooring, 25-ft.-high ceilings, and mezzanines with basic steel stairways formed the shell. Existing mechanical services included air conditioning accommodation, but no ducts, plus appropriate power to be distributed at the individual tenant’s discretion.

Sharing rooms for employees

Absolute parity between the two locations, as well as a nonhierarchical solution, were the primary mandates expressed by Nash and his partner Carl Midson. In fact, they initially eschewed any enclosed offices. And, although Kellen convinced the principals that an all-open resolution would ultimately prove too limiting, Nash and Midson profess to spend most of their time out on the floor rather than secluded behind closed doors. There, they mingle with the fixed project teams that serve such clients as The New York Times, the Washington Post, Ziff Davis, and Interior Design’s parent company Cahners, whose CEO Marc Teren “liked the company so much he bought it,” Nash comments. Out on the floor, employees share the light, views, music from a jukebox always in play, and a provocative landscape alive with color, punched forms, and an underlying sense of discovery.

 

Working space combining with entertaining areas

Working space combining with entertaining areas

Kellen’s “minimalist architectonic scape,” as he terms it,  is one formed chiefly by drywall, with undulating and intersecting planes that are ten inches thick to connote permanence. The planes loosely divide reception areas from the office proper while articulating various work zones. Loose, however, is the operative term, as open areas fit out with lounge furniture and long tables provide equal welcome to guests, project teams, and individual workers needing a change of venue from their work stations. Colors of the dividers are deeply saturated but grayed down, and choices, according to the architect, “just happened.” Only the slate blue tone was fixed in his mind from the start.

Other office rooms

Maple forms the other part of the overall materials palette. The wood is used for flooring “stages” (i.e., raised floors), reception stations, table and counter tops, paneling, and framing for the glass-fronted server room. Instead of being relegated to back-room status, the complex computer system is celebrated in full view. It is, after all, eLogic’s raison d’etre.

That’s the pragmatic side. The less tangible aspect of Kellen’s solution addresses his desire to create a landscape with varying views and layers of abstraction. One’s perception of the interior and its details changes according to viewing angle, seated or standing position, and lighting conditions as filtered from the glass front and skylights. There are also details that become apparent only after the initial impacts of form and color sink in. Nash points out his fascination with the tapering details of wall edges. Kellen remarks on the composition of overlapping duct runs. And then there are the wire glass inserts in the mezzanine’s flooring that allow views down into the server room.

Map of the area

Map of the area

Nash concludes with a comment now common to discussions of office design. There’s not a doubt in his mind that design draws talent as well as facilitates daily operations. The staff and prospective workers “are definitely not as interested in things like pension and health benefits. Most are too young. People need to be seen and need to have an ease of communication with each other. Yes, this place definitely helps with recruiting. Given the choice between an atmosphere like this or an ugly one, what would you do?”

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Storage Designed To Be Seen; If you like to bring a room alive with matching furniture and accessories, then you will love this stylish range of Storage Baskets, Tubs and Storage Cubes that will fi t easily into your home

Ava 3pc change table set

Creating a Nursery Room for the new bub makes most women dream of a beautiful haven for their child. This practical change table set includes one large sized basket which will hold lotions, wraps and creams, whilst the two smaller sized baskets will fit baby wipes and nappies. A great baby shower gift! This cotton lined set also works well in a dresser drawer to organise your delicates. Storage cubes are available in this range and come in baby pink, baby blue and chocolate. Just what you need to hold your baby’s new soft toy collection!

Madison water hyacinth storage cubes

The Madison storage cubes are made from an all natural plant material. With a strong dark leather look handle, the cubes will provide your desired room with a warm, earthy and modern look. Organise your living room and hide remotes, game consoles and DVDs. These cubes can be used in a media unit or cubed bookcase and will allow you to separate the things that your little ones can touch, from the ones that they should not be! Available in two sizes; medium and large.

Madison set of 2 water hyacinth storage tubs

There is no need to hide your children’s toys when guests arrive, now they can be stored away in style. The storage tubs are in sizes low enough for children to explore yet large enough to hold as many toys as you can think of. Strong sturdy handles allow you to move the toys from room to room all in one basket! The Madison range will look just as good filled with pillows, blankets, or towels in the bathroom. This is definitely storage designed to be seen.

 

Space Saving Tricks;

Turn everyday items into clever storage solutions for around the home. We’ve got six easy and affordable ideas

WE ALL NEED more storage space in the home, but that doesn’t have to mean a stack of ugly plastic containers, extra shelving or hiding things away in the attic. With a little creativity and a bit of DIY you can make practical storage solutions that look good, are easily accessible and affordable, too. Here are some cool ideas to get you started.

CUSTOM COATRACK

Making your own wall hat rack/ coatrack is a fun project that can be customised to suit your decor. We used old wooden textile spools/bobbins as they’re a good size and are great for achieving a rustic, vintage look. For something a little more decorative try ornate porcelain doorknobs, although they won’t be as sturdy or hold as many items as a wooden bobbin.

MAKE Bobbin wall hooks

1 Choose five or six old bobbins of the same size (or use different styles and sizes for a more eclectic look) and mark on the wall where you want them to go. Remember to space them equally and high enough up the wall so a long coat wouldn’t drape on the floor when hooked up. 2 Use bugle head screws that are about half the length of your bobbins, and drill the screws halfway into the wall. 3 Squeeze a little craft glue down the centre of the bobbin and push over the screw. Repeat for your remaining bobbins. 4 Leave to dry then hang up your hats, coats and bags. Voila! Your own unique bobbin coatrack.

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HIP Home – raw materials and retro styling has produced a warm and welcoming family home

HIP Home – raw materials and retro styling has produced a warm and welcoming family home

A Beachside House

ALTHOUGH THIS beachside house is just over a year old, its mid-century modernist design – characterised by its simple form, open-plan living, and a sense of bringing the outdoors in – makes it feel like it has sat in the landscape for decades.

beachside house with beautiful green spaces

beachside house with beautiful green spaces

Photographer Dewey Nicks and his wife Stephanie bought the block of land two years ago, and with the help of an architect set about creating their dream family home. The house includes a generously proportioned open-plan kitchen, dining and living area with double recliners and folding tables, with a small library adjacent to that; four bedrooms and two bathrooms – one for “the adults” and one for “the kids” – the couple’s young son and daughter. There’s also a hose outside, near the front door, for washing off sand after a stroll or surf at the beach.

A Warm, Woody and Relaxed Interior for the House

An integral part of the design was the decision to keep all the timber framing exposed, which has resulted in a warm, woody and relaxed interior; it certainly brings a sense of nature indoors. But rather than the plethora of timber making the house feel like an oversized log cabin, it has been subtly downplayed with the installation of large windows and a sweeping expanse of concrete floor, which is kept warm underfoot with radiant heating and sumptuous rugs.

Woody furnitures are used to re-decor the house

Woody furnitures are used to re-decor the house

The wide use of timber and concrete throughout the home has also dictated the neutral colour palette. However, this colour scheme has been broken up with unexpected splashes of colour, such as the bold yellow tiles in the kids’ bathroom (see right), a vibrant red front door and bright artworks throughout.

If the surf is rough, a swimming pool, positioned at the side of the house, always beckons. The pool’s close proximity to the home enhances the feeling of indoor-outdoor living, which is one of Dewey’s favourite aspects of the property. Well, that and the fact it’s a stone’s throw from the ocean. Easy living in a stylish home. Cool.

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An All-White Palette With Natural Wooden Tones Creates A Serene And Stylish Interior

City Living Space

WHEN IT COMES to city living it pays to be adaptable – both in terms of maximising the space you’ve got and how you choose to stamp your personality on it. Luckily, flexibility and a sense of “the practical” comes naturally to Belgian-born Julie van Damme Lagoe and her husband Carey Lagoe. Their comfortable and stylishly decorated all-white cottage is a flexible, small space perfectly suited to their busy lifestyle. Reclining chairs and sofa beds are bought to create relax spaces inside the small house.

City living spaces

City living spaces

Bought An Old House

The couple bought the house a year ago after they were given sudden notice on the place they were renting. “We walked into this house and were instantly smitten by its lovely, villagey feel for something so close to the middle of the city,” Julie says. For Julie, who owns her own production company and works longs hours, an added advantage was that one of the downstairs bedrooms had been converted into a garage, allowing her to drive straight into the property.

In small living space in city, recliners and sofa beds are used to save spaces

In small living space in city, recliners and sofa beds are used to save spaces

“Most people who enter our home for the first time comment on what a nice sense of flow and energy it has,” Julie says. “And it’s incredibly well-proportioned for its 125-square-metre footprint.” Laid out over two floors, the spacious main ensuite loft bedroom upstairs leads out onto a small, sunny deck overlooking the courtyard, while downstairs there’s a guest bedroom and bathroom, with the open-plan lounge, dining areas and kitchen hugging the courtyard in an L-shape.

House Repairing and Re-Innovating

The cottage had been renovated 10 years previously and was dated in terms of fittings and fixtures. The first thing the couple did was to lift the existing tiled floors and replace them with a white epoxy screed floor. Then they expanded the courtyard by encroaching on some of the utility space that runs parallel to it. They also took down a high wall between the two, replacing it with a waist-height wall and wooden gate.

Replace the old one with White Screed floor

Replace the old one with White Screed floor

Courtyard and Tiny Kitchen Decor

“We like open space and we’re quite happy to see our neighbours,” Julie says. “We didn’t want to sacrifice space and charm for privacy.” The couple then replaced the gravel with a deck over the entire courtyard to make it level with the living areas that lead onto it. With the help of a carpenter friend they completely transformed the tiny kitchen by connecting it to the courtyard with a large push-out hatch window.

Tiny Kitchen Decor with Saving space furniture including folding table and reclining chairs

Tiny Kitchen Decor with Saving space furniture including folding table and reclining chairs

Making the House as “a little self-contained urban nest”

Clever storage is another feature of the house. There are hidden toilets concealed within walk-in cupboards in the ensuites, and walls of seamless cupboards and drawers in the main bedroom for Julie’s extensive wardrobe. “Carey can ferret out wasted space a mile away,” Julie laughs. And although small, the house offers this couple the laidback lifestyle they crave in a mercurial mix of light, comfort and flexibility. “It’s like a little self-contained urban nest,” Julie says. “With the added bonus that it’s as close to the city as it is to the ocean.”

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